BRIDGE Update: Gender and Nutrition. Issue No. 96, December 2012

BRIDGE Update: Gender and Nutrition. Issue No. 96, December 2012

Publisher:
Publication Date: Dec 2012
BRIDGE Update: Gender and Nutrition
Issue No. 96, December 2012
http://www.bridge.ids.ac.uk/
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In this issue:
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I. BRIDGE updates: recent activities and publications
a. BRIDGE celebrates its 20th birthday!
b. Call for BRIDGE gender and food security Cutting Edge programme working group members
c. Gender and food security in Malawi

II. Upcoming events and other news
a. New edition of Gender & Development: Beyond gender mainstreaming
b. United Nations Climate Change Conference, Qatar
c. Post 2015 agenda: how to get involved
d. 16 days of activism against gender violence
e. Recent decisions on gender stereotyping from the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women

III. Quick Guide: global resources and gender and nutrition


I. BRIDGE updates: recent activities and publications
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a. BRIDGE celebrates its 20th birthday!
This year BRIDGE is celebrating 20 years of work on gender and development! BRIDGE was set up in 1992 on the initiative of the OECD DAC Gendernet. Its purpose was to provide quality research information on gender equality to support gender advisers in donor agencies. BRIDGE has remained in its home at IDS ever since, and has grown and diversified over the years. To mark this 20th anniversary year, we held a birthday party. Friends of BRIDGE, past and present staff, and BRIDGE International Advisory Committee members got together to celebrate our achievements over the years. You can see some of the birthday messages we collected at the party on our You Tube channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/BRIDGEat20. If you would like to send a video or written birthday message to BRIDGE, please email us at Bridge@ids.ac.uk

b. Call for BRIDGE gender and food security Cutting Edge programme working group members
BRIDGE is currently seeking five individuals for a working group that will contribute to the thinking, framing, dissemination and monitoring and evaluation of an exciting new Cutting Edge programme on gender and food security. We are aiming for a working group with good cross-regional representation, as well as a range of professional backgrounds, skills and perspectives. Ideally working group members will be southern focused, with policy or operational experience on gender and food security and an excellent understanding of the latest debates in research, policy and practice on the issues. Find out more here: http://www.bridge.ids.ac.uk/go/home&id=63249&type=Item&langid=1

c. Gender and food security in Malawi
As part of the gender and food security work we are doing, BRIDGE has been building a community of practice in Malawi. This process began with an initial workshop held near Lilongwe in September 2012, which brought together a focused group of experts from key organisations working on food security, gender and climate change. Discussions took place around what the key challenges are in food security, gender and climate change at present. A number of issues were raised and a process was started to prioritise these challenges. Seeds were also sown for thinking though the purpose, scope, and ways of working of a community of practice. In November the same group was involved in an online discussion with two areas of focus:
• To continue thematic discussions held at the workshop, and prioritise the key challenges in food security, gender and climate change in Malawi at present
• To continue conversations regarding setting up a community of practice on food security, gender and climate change in Malawi

A report on these events will be available shortly. For more information contact Georgina Aboud: G.Aboud@ids.ac.uk



II. Upcoming events and other news:


a. New edition of Gender & Development: Beyond gender mainstreaming
The articles in this edition come out of the Beyond Gender Mainstreaming Learning Project convened during 2011 and 2012 by Gender & Development and the UK Gender and Development Network (a network of UK-based international NGOs) which involved around 200 women and men from the global south and north. Gender and development policymakers, practitioners, and feminist activists debated the progress of gender mainstreaming in development institutions and the state. You can find it here: http://www.genderanddevelopment.org/current.asp

b. United Nations Climate Change Conference, Qatar, 26 November – 7 December
Last week COP 18 took place in Doha, Qatar. Organisations and activists working on climate change were hoping that the negotiations would bring areas of agreement so that women, men, girls and boys can all adapt to and mitigate the impacts of climate change. You can find out about what happened on gender at the conference by visiting the websites of WEDO: http://www.wedo.org/ and Gender CC: http://www.gendercc.net/
c. Post-2015 agenda: how to get involved
As discussions scale up around the development agenda after the Millennium Development Goals end in 2015, women’s rights and gender equality advocates are strategising on how to ensure that the new agenda proactively integrates gender. Two recent useful briefings on this issue are:

UK Gender and Development Network briefing: http://www.gadnetwork.org.uk/storage/GADN%20Briefing%203%20-%20Gender%20equality%20and%20the%20post-2015%20framework.pdf

AWID Friday file:
http://www.awid.org/News-Analysis/Friday-Files/The-Post-2015-Development-Agenda-What-it-Means-and-How-to-Get-Involved

The UN Development Group is running national consultations in 50+ countries to stimulate the debate on the post-2015 development agenda, from June 2012 to early 2013. You can find out more about what’s going on in your region and country, and how you can engage with the debate, at the Beyond 2015 website: http://www.beyond2015.org/

d. 16 days of activism
The 16 days of activism against gender violence campaign ran from November 25th to December 10th and inspired a range of amazing events and resources around the globe. We liked the Say No to Violence Against Women campaign: http://saynotoviolence.org/join-say-no/2012-16-days-activism-against-gender-violence-campaign and Women Living Under Muslim Laws’ daily narratives from activists against gender based violence: http://www.wluml.org/news/day-816-activism-against-gender-violence-fighting-back-reclaiming-public

e. Recent decisions on gender stereotyping from the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women
The latest stereotyping and law update is available from Simone Cusack. It contains information on recent CEDAW Committee decisions on gender stereotypes, as well as information on projects, jurisprudence, articles and books in this area. You can find the update at: http://stereotypingandlaw.wordpress.com/2012/11/26/stereotyping-update-november-2012/



III. Quick guide: global resources on gender and nutrition
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While good nutrition is important throughout the lifespan, efforts to tackle under and malnutrition are increasingly focusing on the “window of opportunity” – the critical time between conception and two years of age. Identifying this window of opportunity for development interventions has resulted in increased recognition of the importance of good nutrition for pregnant and lactating women, with breastfeeding for the first six months of a child’s life being of key importance. A more holistic approach to tackling under nutrition is required, one that does not reinforce traditional gender roles by only seeing women as mothers, but also considers social inequalities, cultural context and the links between nutrition and women’s empowerment across the life cycle more broadly.

In 2010 a collective partnership of bilateral development agencies, CSOs, research institutions, UN agencies and private sector organisations developed a framework for action on Scaling Up Nutrition. The SUN framework’s main elements are:

• Start from the principle that what ultimately matters is what happens at country level.
• Scale up evidence based cost effective interventions, and give high priority to these; for example, the ‘window of opportunity’ from conception to 24 months old.
• Take a multi sector approach that integrates nutrition into work on related sectors and uses under nutrition indicators to measure overall progress.
• Provide substantially scaled up domestic and external assistance for country owned nutrition programmes and capacity (UNSCN, 2011).

The framework does not explicitly address gender. But understanding and tackling gender inequality as part of the implementation of these four elements is an essential ingredient in ensuring the framework’s success. The new SUN Movement Strategy for 2012-2015, the revised road map and the updated progress report for the period 2011-2012 are now available on the SUN website: http://scalingupnutrition.org/.

An online consultation is currently taking place on hunger, food and nutrition security, and the post-2015 development agenda. The consultation is hosted by the Global Forum on Food Security and Nutrition. You can find out more at the following web link:
http://www.fao.org/fsnforum/post2015. Contributions can be sent either via email to
fsn-moderator@fao.org or by posting them directly on the website.

The following resources have been selected from a number of new additions to our Global Resources Database on this topic:

Gender resource portal of the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI)
http://www.ifpri.org/book-20/ourwork/researcharea/gender
International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) gender resource portal includes many resources on gender, food and nutrition security. It contains a number of links to publications on gender and agricultural growth and technologies; childcare and work; education; health and nutrition; household resource allocation; natural resource management; property rights; and collective action. Key resources include: ‘Helping women respond to the global food price crisis,’ and ‘Strengthening women’s control of assets for better development outcomes’.

Video: Gender and Nutrition: interview to Ambassador Brian Bowler and Dr. Grace Malindi, Malawi UN Channel, 2012
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QejOjp09Y1M
How has Malawi come to be regarded as a food-secure country? This side event of the 56th session of the Commission on the Status of Women (2012) is an interview with Dr. Grace Malindi, Technical Director of the National Smallholder Farmers’ Association of Malawi (NASFAM) and Malawi’s UN Ambassador Brian Bowler. They speak about improvements being made to nutrition and food security in Malawi and Southeast Africa, and the crucial roles of civil society organisations and rural Malawian women.

Food and Agriculture Organisation of the UN (2012), Gender and Nutrition: draft issue paper
http://www.fao.org/fileadmin/user_upload/wa_workshop/docs/Gender-Nutrition_FAO_IssuePaper_Draft.pdf

This draft issue paper was prepared by FAO in October 2012 as a working document before submission to and discussion within the UNSCN, with a view to developing consensual briefs for non-specialists on crosscutting issues impacting food and nutrition security. It seeks to discuss the main links between gender and nutrition, highlighting opportunities for increased synergy, and provide recommendations for improved policies, programming and projects. Comments from stakeholders on the working document are invited by the FAO.

PHI, WHO, UNDP, et al (2012), Food and nutrition security, health and gender equality: partnerships for climate-resilient sustainable development
http://tinyurl.com/ck6ahsw
This policy brief provides key recommendations with a view to Rio+20 and the post-2015 development agenda. It argues that food and nutrition security, climate change, health, gender equality and environmental degradation are closely interlinked, requiring integrated strategies. The brief sets out five key messages, and argues that increasing women's engagement, empowerment and leadership can help counter the challenges faced by the world’s poorest people.

Meinzen-Dick, R et al. (2011), Gender: A key dimension linking agricultural programs to improved nutrition and health.
http://tinyurl.com/blkyd9z
Empirical evidence shows that increasing women’s control over land, physical assets, and financial assets serves to raise agricultural productivity, improve child health and nutrition, and increase expenditures on education, as women are more likely than men to spend income on food, healthcare and the education of their children. This book chapter focuses on three agricultural development strategies 1) linking smallholders to markets, 2) large-scale agriculture, and 3) homestead food production, to illustrate the significance of the gender dimension and how women’s increased access over resources can occur.

Food and Nutrition Analysis Unit (2012), Gender in emergency food security, livelihoods and nutrition in Somalia
http://reliefweb.int/sites/reliefweb.int/files/resources/Gender-Report-Emergency-Food-Security-Livelihoods-and-Nutrition_1.pdf
This Food and Nutrition Analysis Unit (FNASU) desk based review examines traditional and changing gender roles and responsibilities in food security, livelihood and nutrition, examining what is known about the Somalian context and gaps in knowledge. The research examines different regions of Somalia, looking at commonalities and variations in intra household distribution, breastfeeding, and infant and young child feeding.

You can find other resources on gender and nutrition by typing ‘nutrition’ at: http://www.bridge.ids.ac.uk/index.cfm?objectid=9C00A9E6-BAD9-AC5E-E53190748926F722

Please also visit the archive section to view past Quick Guide selections:
http://www.bridge.ids.ac.uk/go/email-updates-and-publications-by-post/bridge-updates

Follow us on Twitter: @BRIDGE_IDS

This BRIDGE Update was edited by Angela de Prairie.

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