BRIDGE Update: Gender and Disabilities. Issue No. 95, October 2012

BRIDGE Update: Gender and Disabilities. Issue No. 95, October 2012

Publisher:
Publication Date: Oct 2012
BRIDGE Update: Gender and Disabilities
Issue No. 95, October 2012
http://www.bridge.ids.ac.uk/
Past issues of the update are available at:
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In This Issue:
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I. BRIDGE updates: recent activities and publications
a. New BRIDGE Cutting Edge programme on gender and food security
b. Call for photographs for forthcoming the Cutting Edge Pack on gender and social movements
c. European conference on Advancing Gender Training to Support Effective Gender Mainstreaming
d. SendasAL - new website
e. BRIDGE online survey – still time to participate!

II. Upcoming events and other news
a. IDS Practice Paper: ‘Learning about mainstreaming gender in knowledge intermediary work’
b. Fifth World Conference on Women (5WCW)
c. International Day for Disaster Reduction 2012 - Women and girls: the [in]visible force of resilience
d. Statement of solidarity: ‘What the women say: protection and participation of Syrian women’

III. Quick Guide: global resources and gender and disabilities


I. BRIDGE updates: recent activities and publications
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a. New BRIDGE Cutting Edge programme on Gender and Food Security
The latest BRIDGE Cutting Edge programme has begun. Its goal is to explore the links between gender and food security, with an emphasis on gender inequalities in access to resources both for production and consumption. It is also exploring the ways to ensure that food security interventions empower women, contributing to a more nuanced approach that goes beyond seeing women as ‘good for hunger alleviation’. We will bring you further news on the programme’s progress in future updates and let you know how you can get involved.

b. Call for photographs for forthcoming the Cutting Edge Pack on Gender and Social Movements
This new Cutting Edge Pack will be published next summer and we would like to find interesting and relevant images to appear in the overview report. We would like to hear from you if you have taken photographs that are relevant for the topic, which you have permission to use, and which you would like to see included in the report (photographers will of course be fully credited in the report). The specifications for photographs are that they: do not exceed is 5MB (expected minimum file size 2.5MB); are no less than 300 dpi in resolution; and are in TIFF/JPEG format only. Please contact Jenny Birchall about this: j.birchall@ids.ac.uk

c. European conference on Advancing Gender Training to Support Effective Gender Mainstreaming
On 13-14 November BRIDGE staff members will be attending a European conference on “Advancing Gender Training to Support Effective Gender Mainstreaming”. The Conference is part of a two year project on “Gender Training in the European Union: Mapping, Research and Stakeholders’ Engagement”, which aims to collect practical information available in the field of gender training, create new knowledge and facilitate dialogue among policy-makers, trainers and researchers on the use of gender training for better informed policy-making in the EU and Member States. At the end of 2012, the organisers will launch an EU-wide database composed of gender trainers and training resources. You can find out more about the conference here: http://www.eige.europa.eu/content/event/advancing-gender-training-to-support-effective-gender-mainstreaming/register/1a2e0c2cc04a3

d. SendasAL - new website
SendasAL is a jointly run initiative between BRIDGE our partner in Uruguay, CIEDUR, a non-governmental centre for interdisciplinary development studies. As you may already know, SendasAL provides a web space that hosts materials from BRIDGE Cutting Edge Programmes and resources identified by CIEDUR on the same thematic areas from Latin American organisations, governments and institutions. Such resources include case studies, good practice examples, research papers and reports. The SendasAL site has now been completely revamped. It has been redesigned to include a new thematic page on gender and climate change (which includes BRIDGE's and CIEDUR's resources, as well as resources produced by organisations in the LAC region), pictures and new sections, including a multimedia section with videos, and a directory of organizations and government bodies working on gender issues in the region. Please visit the site: http://sendasal.org/, follow the team on Twitter: @SendasAL, and contribute to the site with news or resources.

e. BRIDGE on-line survey – still time to participate!
Later this year, we will be celebrating our 20th anniversary. In preparation for this, and to help us plan our work for the future, we'd like to hear your thoughts and views about BRIDGE products and services. If you have 10 minutes to spare, please take part in our online survey: http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/JDYT5XF

II. Upcoming events and other news:
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a. IDS Practice Paper: ‘Learning about mainstreaming gender in knowledge intermediary work’, October 2012
http://www.ids.ac.uk/publication/learning-about-mainstreaming-gender-in-knowledge-intermediary-work
These are the early findings of a gender review undertaken in the Institute of Development Studies (IDS) Knowledge Services department, representing the first step in a broader equality mainstreaming process to measure what Knowledge Services is doing well on equality and where it can improve.

b. Fifth World Conference on Women (5WCW)
This site: http://5wcw.org was created as a clearing house of information and grassroots activism opportunities for those who support and wish to advocate for a United Nations sponsored 5th World Conference on Women. Discussions about the proposed 5WCW are taking place in various forums. A recent summary by Susan Tolmay of AWID readers’ thoughts on the challenges, opportunities, purpose and conditions of the proposed 5WCW can be found at: http://awid.org/Library/The-Proposed-Fifth-World-Conference-on-Women-A-Time-to-Take-Stock-and-Demand-Implementation

c. International Day for Disaster Reduction 2012 - Women and girls: the [in]visible force of resilience
The theme of the International Day for Disaster Reduction (IDDR) 2012, on 13th October, is ‘Women and Girls: the [in]Visible Force of Resilience’, drawing attention to the fact that their efforts to protect and rebuild their communities before, and after, disasters are often unrecognized. Visit the IDDR 2012 website for further information: http://www.unisdr.org/2012/iddr/

d. Statement of solidarity: ‘What the women say: protection and participation of Syrian women’
http://www.gnwp.org/?s=statement+solidarity+Syria
Women of the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region and South Asia, with colleagues from North America and Europe met last month for the first regional “What the Women Say” Forum on Women’s Rights, Peace and Security to express their solidarity with Syrian women, who are suffering from atrocities in the on-going conflict.

III. Quick guide: global resources on gender and disabilities
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Women and girls with disabilities are often more vulnerable to poverty and human rights abuses. More evidence is needed to generate a better understanding of the intersections between gender and disability, and greater efforts to redress discrimination are required. BRIDGE has collected a number of resources on these topics, some of which are included in this Quick Guide.

The Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) reported this year that there is a general lack of systematised and disaggregated data on violence against women and girls with disabilities. Although it remains largely invisible, research indicates that women and girls with disabilities experience a high rate of violence, especially those with intellectual disabilities; these abuses take place in their homes, communities, schools, public and private institutions.

Increasingly, disabled women are building networks and movements to seek solidarity and exercise their rights. For example, the International Network of Women with Disabilities (comprised of women and allies from international, regional, national and local organisations) works with the International Disability Alliance to promote the effective and full implementation (including gender mainstreaming provisions) of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD). However, the particular barriers that disabled people and women face regarding information and communication technology limit their access to resources, as well as participation in Internet-based communities and campaigns.

Last month, the Association for Women Rights in Development (AWID) published a conversation with Maria Veronica Reina, Executive Director of Global Partnership for Disability and Development: http://www.awid.org/News-Analysis/Friday-Files/Women-with-disabilities-and-economic-rights, who said that deaf and blind women especially lack access to information and communication in adequate formats. Among the best practices she identifies to improve the economic situation of disabled women are: passing and enforcing reasonable accommodation or adjustment laws, and improving access to tailored education and training.

The following resources have been selected from a number of new additions to our Global Resources Database:

‘Thematic study on the issue of violence against women and girls and disability’, Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, 2012
http://www.bridge.ids.ac.uk/go/home&id=62826&type=Document&langID=1
This report describes the causes and manifestations of violence against women and girls with disabilities, and makes number of policy recommendations The study involved a questionnaire to UN Member States, NGOs and other relevant stakeholders, as well as consultations with relevant Special Rapporteurs and committees.

‘Count me in! Research report on violence against disabled, lesbian, and sex-working women in Bangladesh, India, and Nepal’, CREA, 2012
http://bridge.ids.ac.uk/go/home&id=62430&type=Document&langID=1
This report by CREA, in partnership with University College London, is based on the first ever multi-country research study on violence against disabled, lesbian and sex-working women. It concludes that societies should view and address social exclusion, stigma, discrimination and violence through a more deeply rooted equality-based approach.
On-line series: Barbara Waxman Fiduccia papers on women and girls with disabilities, 2012
http://bridge.ids.ac.uk/go/home&id=62421&type=Document&langID=1
This collection of papers is a continuation of the series launched in 1999 by the Center for Women Policy Studies. Comprised of twelve papers from 2011-2012, the issues covered include conflict, violence, reproductive health, AIDS, disability rights, employment, education and participation in politics and development.

Batliwala, S. (ed), et al, ‘Changing their world: concepts and practices of women’s movements, 2nd edition’, Association for Women’s Rights in Development, 2011
http://bridge.ids.ac.uk/go/home&id=62436&type=Document&langID=1
This collection includes a paper entitled, 'The seeds of a movement: disabled women and their struggle to organise', by Janet Price, which addresses various aspects of disability politics - from the male domination of the disability discourse to inclusion issues within the women's movement.

Report: ‘2nd Regional Conference on Women with Disabilities 2010 in Guangzhou, China’, Disabled Peoples' International Asia-Pacific Region (DPI/AP), 2010
http://bridge.ids.ac.uk/go/home&id=58363&type=Document&langID=1
This report documents the 2nd Regional Conference on Women with Disabilities. Included are summaries of workshops, talks and conclusions. Among the key findings are a number of issues regarding reproductive rights, including coerced abortions and the removed of babies from disabled women.

Human Rights Watch, ‘“As if we weren’t human”: discrimination and violence against women with disabilities in Northern Uganda, 2010
http://bridge.ids.ac.uk/go/home&id=57491&type=Document&langID=1
This report describes abuse and discrimination against women and girls with disabilities in Uganda’s northern region after 20 years of war, and the efforts of humanitarian aid actors and government (local and national) to include women with disabilities. Recommendations to various humanitarian and development actors are also made.

You can find other resources on gender and people with disabilities at: http://bridge.ids.ac.uk/index.cfm?objectid=0D55A037-5056-8122-57F5B5D056E40B21

Please also visit the archive section to view past Quick Guide selections:
http://www.bridge.ids.ac.uk/go/email-updates-and-publications-by-post/bridge-updates

Follow us on Twitter: @BRIDGE_IDS

This BRIDGE Update was edited by Angela de Prairie.

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